California Innocence Project Students

Sponsor our work!

Sarah is an Innocence Project student from England

Abigail

Hi, my name is Abigail, and I’m a second-year law student at California Western. I was always encouraged to become a lawyer but I didn’t have a reason to go to law school. I took a Foundations in Law class in high school and learned about the California Innocence Project which inspired me to become a lawyer. I want to help people and fight for those who don’t have support. I decided to join the California Innocence Project because I knew I would be able to use my voice to advocate for people in the Criminal Justice System.

Thomas-Innocence-Project-Student from California

Anya

Hello! My name is Anya, and I am a second-year law student at California Western School of Law. I earned my Bachelor of Arts in English Literature from Arizona State University. I became aware of wrongful conviction issues when I wrote a paper about wrongfully convicted death row inmates. The research I did showed me how flawed the system can be for some people and fueled interest in seeing justice for those affected.

I am honored to be given the chance to work with the California Innocence Project as a Clinical Intern. I learned about CIP while I was researching law schools and feel that it is an incredible opportunity for law students to gain real-world experience advocating for CIP’s wrongfully convicted clients. Opportunities like CIP are part of the reason I chose CWSL as the place to earn my law degree. CIP’s mission to free wrongfully convicted inmates is one that is crucial in a system where those who are innocent can be imprisoned. I am truly humbled that I get to be a small part of it!

Diana is an Innocence Project student from New York.

Bri

Hi! My name is Bri and I am a second-year law student at California Western School of Law. I attended the University of Arizona where I earned a double degree in Law and Political Science.

I entered college knowing I wanted to pursue a career in criminal law, however, I was not exactly sure where I saw myself in the criminal law field. One day during my criminal law class, we discussed the story of the “Central Park Five.” I was astounded by the fact that proof of innocence is not always enough to release wrongfully convicted individuals. I became deeply concerned by the lack of accountability that exists within the criminal justice system. I then began researching the underlying causes of wrongful convictions which led me to prosecutorial misconduct, police misconduct, and flawed criminal justice policies & procedures. My research left me with a lingering question – how are we, as a society, supposed to trust a system that has failed so many of those who are inherently good and factually innocent? It was at that moment I realized my passion was not only geared towards helping people but also towards fighting to correct injustice while implementing structural change to reform our criminal justice system.

I wanted to be a part of the solution, and when I discovered the California Innocence Project, I knew I had found exactly what I’d been searching for. It is truly an honor to be a part of an organization that fights for those faced with injustice while also working hard to make an impactful difference.

Adam is an Innocence Project student born in Southern California.

Cesar

Hello! My name is Cesar and I am a second-year law student at California Western School of Law. I grew up in National City, the best city in San Diego, and attended San Diego State University where I earned my Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice. I like to learn about new ways to help my community and hope to one day give back to the city that raised me, in a meaningful way. I also enjoy listening to music, writing album reviews, and finding new and interesting podcasts.I was introduced to innocence work after learning about Bryan Stevenson and the Equal Justice Initiative during my first year in college. I eventually became familiar with the California Innocence Project and their organization was one of the reasons I wanted to attend Cal Western. I respect everything that CIP does to help those who have been wrongfully convicted. I’m honored to be involved with CIP and help them free the innocent!

Christie is an Innocence Project student from Ventura.

Cortnee

Hello! My name is Cortnee and I am a second-year law student at California Western School of Law. I graduated from California State University, San Bernardino with a degree in Criminal Justice and a minor in Pre-Law. During my undergraduate career, I became aware of the gross disparities and injustices within our criminal justice system. This developed my passion to fight for those individuals whose voices go unheard.

I decided to attend California Western School of Law after I learned about the California Innocence Project. I knew I wanted to join CIP and help fight for those who have been wrongfully convicted. I am honored to be a part of CIP and work alongside amazing attorneys who are making a difference in individual’s lives and in the criminal justice system. I am excited to help advocate for the individuals who suffer injustices by the criminal justice system and help them regain their freedom.

Jasmine is an Innocence Project student from San Diego.

Daisy

Hello! My name is Daisy and I am a second-year law student at California Western School of Law. I graduated from Chico State with a degree in Legal Studies and a minor in Criminal Justice. I grew up in Escondido and moved back when I graduated from Chico State in 2018.

During my undergraduate career, I worked as a legal research assistant at Butte County Jail. This exposed me to the injustices embedded in the American justice system. I chose to attend law school because I want to become an advocate for those who feel underrepresented or discriminated against. I chose the California Western School of Law because of the California Innocence Project. I wanted to be a part of an amazing team that fights for justice.

I am honored to be a clinical intern for the California Innocence Project this year. I am committed to bringing my knowledge, skills, and dedication to this organization. As a former fundraiser, I also know the importance of donations from people in our community. Please consider donating to help students and staff advocate for the innocent.

Jasmine is an Innocence Project student from San Diego.

Dulce

Hi! My name is Dulce and I am a second-year law student at California Western School of Law. I grew up in San Ysidro, California. I graduated from the University of California, San Diego with a degree in Literature in English.

Growing up I always thought I would become a teacher. However, in college, I began to take classes that highlighted the social and economic disparities of members in communities much like the one I grew up in. Through these classes, I realized that working in law was the best way to help alleviate these issues. When I learned of the California Innocence Project, I knew I wanted to work with the program. Not only will it help me become a better advocate in the future, but it will allow me to help those wrongfully imprisoned. I am excited to see what the year holds!

Aislinn is an Innocence Project student from Banning, CA.

Janey

Hello! My name is Janey, and I am a second-year law student at California Western School of Law.

I can trace three moments that came together to bring me to the study of law. An event, an inspiration and a challenge. The first was hearing a guilty verdict for someone I knew to be innocent. The next was face-to-face meetings with exonerees and their families from all over the country and discovering the extended community of people working for justice for the wrongly accused. And the third was a challenge from a lawyer friend: “In just three years, you could be an attorney.”

California Western School of Law, home to the California Innocence Project, brought everything into focus. It became an answer I didn’t even realize I was looking for. Pursuing justice for someone I loved had become an everyday part of my life. The opportunity to help others realize justice is a natural next step. I am so grateful to have been chosen as a clinical intern for the California Innocence Project. It’s hard to convey how meaningful it is to be able to combine law classes with the real-life experience of working on cases.

We’re all presented with opportunities to make a difference in someone’s life; and those choices shape our own lives in the process. If you’re able, please consider donating to the California Innocence Project. You can help make a life-changing difference for an innocent person—a good thing to add to your life’s accomplishments.

Ching Yun is an Innocence Project student from Hong Kong.

Kimberly

Hello! My name is Kimberly and I am a second-year law student at California Western School of Law. A Southern California native, I attended California State University, San Marcos, and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Communication.

I want to become a lawyer to provide a voice for those whose voice was silenced due to the inequity in the current legal system. My passion gravitated toward criminal justice because I realized how many underserved individuals lose out on freedom. I knew I wanted to be part of The California Innocence Project after learning how they committed to exonerating Brian Banks from a false rape allegation. I feel blessed to have this unique opportunity to work alongside people who make such a difference in the world. Interning at the Innocence Project will provide me the mentorship and an opportunity to sharpen my legal skills. I will also learn from experienced lawyers how to create a career of ending wrongful convictions and doing my part to reform the criminal justice system.

Dylan is an Innocence Project student from Arizona.

Nicole

Hi! My name is Nicole and I am a second-year law student at California Western School of Law. I grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, where I attended San Jose State University. I graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and a minor in Human Rights. Through my Human Rights courses, I became more aware of the issues within our criminal justice system. I discovered my passion to make a difference in underrepresented communities, but I did not know how to translate this into a career until I read Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson. The stories of people who lost their lives to our prejudiced system moved me so much that I instantly knew that I wanted to work towards freeing the wrongfully incarcerated.

I moved to San Diego to attend California Western School of Law to be a part of the California Innocence Project (CIP). I am honored to have the opportunity to work alongside a team of selfless individuals as a clinical intern for CIP. I am looking forward to making a real difference in our criminal justice system.

Esther is an Innocence Project student from Los Angeles

Rachel

Hi! My name is Rachel, and I am currently a second-year law student at California Western School of Law. I graduated from Northern Arizona University with a bachelor of science degree in psychology and a minor in political science. My passion for law is driven by a want to help people in some of the most difficult times of their lives.

I first became interested in wrongful convictions when I had the opportunity during undergrad to intern at a law firm that heavily focused on post-conviction litigation. Through that internship, I was introduced to the awful injustice some people face and the hopeless they feel by the justice system failing them. This experience motivated me to be a part of the change and fight for the wrongfully convicted. I am honored to be a clinical intern in an organization that works diligently and passionately to fight against the injustice in our criminal justice system. I look forward to working alongside the CIP team and advocating for the wrongfully convicted and freeing the innocent.

Tommy is an Innocence Project student from the midwest.

Saul

Hello, my name is Saul and I am a second-year law student at California Western School of Law. I was born and raised in El Paso, Texas. I spent twelve years in the United States Marine Corps before deciding to attend law school. The same deep-rooted desire to fight that led me to join the military also shaped my decision to be part of the California Innocence Project.

I first heard of CIP when I was researching law schools. The possibility of joining a team established to address such injustice made my choice to attend California Western. I am excited to join the fight against the injustice suffered by those wrongfully convicted.

Rebecca is an Innocence Project student from Orange County.

Success

My name is Success, and I am a second-year law student at California Western School of Law. I am a native of Los Angeles, California. I earned my Bachelor of Arts in Political Science with an emphasis in Philosophy and Criminal Justice at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. At the center of my devotion to a career in criminal law is the desire to help men and women from marginalized communities reclaim their lives against a broken justice system.

It is an honor to be a Clinical Intern for the California Innocence Project. I am certain that my experience with the California Innocence Project will aid my growth as a future attorney. It is a privilege to be a member of such an admirable organization and community. I am eager to work among other zealous agents of change here at the California Innocence Project as we help influence criminal justice reform and exonerate the wrongfully convicted.